We all know Wargaming for their World of games. Wargaming started out with World of Tanks, later World of Warplanes (and the 2.0 version) joined the family and the last one joining the World of series is my favourite: World of Warships.

World of Tanks has been around for quite some time and you might know every spot on the map, know when to hold, to attack and where to flank an enemy. But sometimes things happen that I just want to see in a replay, that’s why the game enabled this option. So you can analyse every step you take frame by frame, just to make sure it will not happen again. You can do this while chilling in your game room in front of one, two or three of your displays.

But Wargaming and the Special Project Divison had bigger plans for World of Tanks AR. There is so much more you can do than analyse your replay. World of Tanks AR would be more useful when you teach people about historical events. This is why the Special Project focus shifted to education instead.

All you need is a table and a few Ipads to relive famous battlefields, with the mean reason to show people what really went on based on stories and reports of these battlefields. This way is the best way to not only tell history, but it will also give you perfect ‘live-footage’ of the battle that you can see from all direction on the fly. The best thing is that you can share this with others who are there with you at the table.

By using this technology and the power of AR gives people a chance to relive historical moments, see why those moments still might be important for the future and it’s the best way to learn from the past.

Because Wargaming might make games about war, they want to educate people as well so that the history will never repeat itself. And the best source to teach the people of tomorrow is to understand the past.